4 Best Movies to Watch by Jack Lowden

Staff & contributors

, 2016

Here’s a based-on-a-true-story courtroom drama that transcends the limits of its genre by virtue of an incisive and unexpectedly prescient script. Twenty years before 2016 sent us hurtling through the looking glass and into a post-truth era, the idea that you could deny the facts as you pleased teetered terrifyingly on the brink of legitimacy when author David Irving (a suitably odious Timothy Spall) brought a UK libel suit against Deborah Lipstadt (Rachel Weisz), an academic whom he claimed had defamed him for calling him exactly what he was: a Holocaust denier.

The case was complicated by the fact that, at the time, the UK placed the burden of proof on the defendant — in other words, Lipstadt’s hotshot legal team needed to prove that the Holocaust happened and that Irving had wilfully misrepresented evidence demonstrating this. Denial captures that terrifying farcicality and the defense’s cleverly counterintuitive strategy: not allowing Lipstadt or Holocaust survivors to speak. If that sounds unsatisfying — this is the rare courtroom drama with no grandstanding speech from the protagonist — that’s the point, something the film’s title cleverly alludes to. Perhaps unexpectedly, Denial’s relevance has ballooned since its release, a fact that might hobble its hopeful ending but that only makes the rest all the more powerful.

Genre: Drama, History

Actor: Abigail Cruttenden, Alex Jennings, Amanda Lawrence, Andrea Deck, Andrew Scott, Caren Pistorius, Daniel Cerqueira, Edward Franklin, Elliot Levey, Harriet Walter, Helen Bradbury, Hilton McRae, Ian Bartholomew, Jack Lowden, Jackie Clune, Jeremy Paxman, John Sessions, Lachele Carl, Laura Evelyn, Mark Gatiss, Max Befort, Mick Jackson, Nicholas Tennant, Nikki Amuka-Bird, Paul Bailey, Paul Hunter, Pip Carter, Rachel Weisz, Sally Messham, Sara Powell, Sean Power, Timothy Spall, Todd Boyce, Tom Clarke Hill, Tom Wilkinson, Will Attenborough, Ziggy Heath

Director: Mick Jackson

Rating: PG-13

Fighting with My Family manages to pull off a respectable pro wrestling movie with a lighthearted teen drama slant — a nice change of pace and a victory in itself. Saraya (Florence Pugh) and her family paint the movie with dorky crass jokes, but the film doesn’t seem to tread that line masterfully enough to where we look past her family’s obnoxiousness and find it purely charming instead. But there is more to like here than not: Vince Vaughn as levelheaded NXT coach Hutch Morgan, Dwayne Johnson as himself, and even the blonde girls posse were a little more than just clichés and added a sense of maturity to the portrayal of modern WWE.

Genre: Comedy

Actor: Adam Maxted, Aqueela Zoll, Ashley Darkwood, Bobbi Tyler, Brendon Burns, Charlie Sterling, Chloe Csengery, Christine Ozanne, Chuey Okoye, Ciaran Dowd, David Minton, Dwayne Johnson, Ellie Gonsalves, Elroy Powell, Florence Pugh, Hannah Dodd, Hannah Rae, Jack Gouldbourne, Jack Lowden, James Burrows, Jerome Fleisch, Jerry Lawler, John Cena, John Layfield, Jonathan Jules, Josh Myers, Julia Davis, Julia Hamer-Bevis, Justin Sysum, Kim Matula, Leah Harvey, Lena Headey, Michael Coulthard, Mike Mizanin, Mohammad Amiri, Nick Frost, Olivia Bernstone, Paul Robinson, Paul Wight, Rishi Ghosh, Rod Zapata, Roy Bevis, Samantha Allen, Samantha Alleyne, Saraya-Jade Bevis, Simon Kippen, Simon Musk, Stephen Farrelly, Stephen Merchant, Thea Trinidad, Thomas Whilley, Tori Ellen Ross, Vince Vaughn

Director: Stephen Merchant

Rating: PG-13